Travel to Croatia

Croatia is one of our furthest motorhome destinations. To visit this spectacular place you really do need to be thinking of going on holiday for around three weeks. The reason for this is that it is a long way to drive. Don’t be put off though, we can help you make the journey there all part of the holiday. Your holiday doesn’t start when you get to Croatia, it starts as soon as you leave us in your motorhome. 

The Journey

The journey to Croatia will take you through France, Germany, Austria and Slovenia. So there is plenty to see on your way, the trip totals around 1170 miles. A real adventure. 

Which part of Croatia?

The place that we have visited ourselves and therefore the place we would recommend is Rovinj.

Why visit Rovinj?

The campsite that we recommend to you is set in an idyllic position right on the edge of the sea. There is a boat which leaves regularly and takes you across the water to Rovinj. The campsite is perfect for relaxation and after a long journey across Europe we found it the ideal place to enjoy the sun and sea for a couple of days before venturing to Rovinj.

Visiting Rovinj is very much like stepping back in time to when places were more unspoilt and less touristy. It’s a truly charming place. The old town is contained within an egg-shaped peninsula, webbed with steep cobbled streets and small squares, and punctuated by a tall church tower rising from the highest point. Originally an island, it was only connected to the mainland in 1763 when the narrow channel separating it was filled.

 It is so pretty, and also lively with its numerous cafes and restaurants, galleries and an active fishing port. In fact, in the mornings you can watch the fishermen come in as you have your breakfast.

Sightseeing in Rovinj

Visiting the Church of St Euphemia (completed in 1736) is a absolute must – this is the largest Baroque building in Istria. Built according to plans by Venetian architect Giovanni Dizzi, the bell tower on the church is a copy of the one at St Mark’s Basilica in Venice. At 61 metres high, it is the tallest in Istria. The tower has a statue of St. Euphemia on it which is mounted so it moves according to wind direction. There are spectacular views over the rooftops of Rovinj and to the nearby islands from the top of the bell tower.

The Balbi Arch (Croatian: Luk Balbi) is from 1680 and is located at the spot which was once the entrance to Rovinj. The arch contains the coat of arms of the noble Balbi family and the Lion of Saint Mark, a symbol of the Venetian Empire.

Ulica Grisia is one of the main thoroughfares through the old part of town. It gets very busy during summer when an open air art festival is held.

The Old Town itself is another must see, and a reflection of what Rovinj was like when it was all packed onto one crowded island. The narrow, winding, cobbled streets, crammed-together houses and buildings and picturesque squares allow you to spend a lovely afternoon. Take a slow wander around before heading towards the harbour to stop at a cafe for a refreshing drink.

The Town Museum on Trg M Tita near the harbour is home to various archeological findings, and paintings and sculptures.