Discover France

Motorhome Hire France

France has been one of the world’s favourite tourist destinations for the last few decades. The reason for this is most likely because France has something for everyone. A holiday in France can include sightseeing, enjoying the nightlife, walking, trekking, enjoying time on the beach, water sports, skiing, adventure sports, skiing or just relaxing in the sun in the South. France has amazing architecture, many castles and chateaux in beautiful surroundings and is well known for its fine wines and cuisine.

France is divided in to 22 regions. All the regions include popular tourist destinations, however there are huge differences in culture, character and climate from one region to another.

When visiting France it is best to think of it as split in to six areas:

  • North West France
  • The Heart of France
  • North East France
  • South-West France
  • Upland France
  • Southern France

Below is a list of the main tourist destinations within each area. 

Paris

Paris, France’s capital, is a major European city and a global centre for art, fashion, gastronomy and culture. Its 19th-century cityscape is crisscrossed by wide boulevards and the River Seine. Beyond such landmarks as the Eiffel Tower and the 12th-century, Gothic Notre-Dame cathedral, the city is known for its cafe culture and designer boutiques along the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré.

Brittany

If there’s one word that British visitors indelibly associate with Brittany, it’s beaches. Great beaches are everywhere you look, from the posh north-coast watering hole of Dinard, beloved by nineteenth-century British aristocrats, to any number of humbler family resorts strung along the entire, endlessly intricate and gloriously unpredictable coastline.

Some of the region’s abundant strands of sand bustle with life and energy, lined with hotels and restaurants to suit all budgets; others lie tucked away at the end of unpromising little rural lanes, rewarding those who take the trouble to find them with splendid, unspoiled isolation.

Mont Saint Michel and Normandy

Le Mont-Saint-Michel is an island commune in Normandy, France. It is located about one kilometre off the country’s northwestern coast, at the mouth of the Couesnon River near Avranches and is 100 hectares in size

Loire River

There are so many places to visit in the region, that once you have sampled the experience you’ll want to return time and time again. It’s the perfect place for your holiday in France and it’s so much more than just chateaux.

The rich landscape offers great rivers, vibrant cities like Orleans and Tours, historical medieval towns such as Chinon and Loches, beautiful villages like Montresor, natural parks in La Brenne and Anjou, some of the best wines of France and a host of local delicacies. There is a plethora of festivals throughout the year to give you a taste of the region’s unique culture and heritage.

The area also has been touched by many historical figures from Richard the Lionheart to Joan of Arc and Leonardo de Vinci. It has also inspired poets and novelists for centuries, with some of its native sons, such as Rabelais and Balzac, using the area as a setting their works.

Strasbourg

Strasbourg is the capital of the Alsace region of France and is most widely known for hosting a number of important European institutions. It is also famous for its beautiful historical centre, the Grande Île, which was the first city centre to be classified entirely as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

La Rochelle

La Rochelle is a dynamic, welcoming and lively city which will captivate you with its maritime character. Anchored to the Atlantic coast, near the Islands of Ré and Oléron, La Rochelle is best discovered and enjoyed through its various ports: the Old Port in the city centre, the marina at les Minimes, the Commercial port of La Pallice and the fishing port of Chef de Baie. It’s exceptional water and its taste for sports challenges have made it a household name on the national and international boating circuit.

The French Alps

The French Alps are the portion of the Alps mountain range that stand within France, located in the Rhône-Alpes and Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur regions.

Bordeaux

The city of Bordeaux is among France’s most exciting, vibrant and dynamic cities. In the last decade and a half, it’s shed its languid, Belle au Bois Dormant (Sleeping Beauty) image. This is all thanks to the vision of city mayor Alain Juppé who’s pedestrianised boulevards, restored neoclassical architecture, created a high-tech public transport system and reclaimed Bordeaux’s former industrial wet docks at Bassin à Flots.

St Tropez, Cannes and Nice

St Tropez is a very chic place with good nightlife. You will find that it is a haven for the very wealthy. It is a place to see and most definitely a place to be seen.

Cannes and Nice are both charming cities and well worth a visit, as are the beaches in this area of France. If designer shopping is your passion, Cannes is an ideal location.

Cannes, a resort town on the French Riviera, is famed for its international film festival. Its Boulevard de la Croisette, curving along the coast, is lined with sandy beaches, upmarket boutiques and palatial hotels. It’s also home to the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès, a modern building complete with red carpet and Allée des Stars – Cannes’ walk of fame.

Nice, the capital of the Alpes-Maritimes department on the French Riviera, sits on the pebbly shores of the Baie des Anges. Founded by the Greeks and later a retreat for 19th-century European elite, the city has also long attracted artists. Former resident Henri Matisse is honored with a career-spanning collection of paintings at Musée Matisse. Musée Marc Chagall features some of its namesake’s major religious works.

Monaco

Monaco is a tiny independent city-state on France’s Mediterranean coastline known for its upscale casinos, yacht-lined harbor and prestigious Grand Prix motor race, which runs through Monaco’s streets once a year. Monte-Carlo, its major district, is home to an elegant belle-époque casino complex and ornate Salle Garnier opera house. It also has many luxury hotels, boutiques, nightclubs and restaurants.

Dordogne

For many years, British travellers have been fascinated by, ‘the Dordogne”, an area of France that conjures up an image of a return to rural life at a slow pace. It has even been said that the Dordogne, for the English, is imagined not really as an area of modern France, but more as an imaginary reproduction of a bygone rural England. It has been likened to a warmer and sunnier version of the Cotswolds, where the houses are built of honey-coloured stone, the meadows are green and rich and the locals are all friendly and obliging.

Provence

Arguably the most irresistible region in France, Provence ranges from the snow-capped mountains of the southern Alps to the delta plains of the Camargue and boasts Europe’s greatest canyon, the Gorges du Verdon. Fortified towns guard its ancient borders; countless villages perch defensively on hilltops; and great cities like Arles, Aix and Avignon are full of cultural glories. The sensual inducements of Provence include sunshine, food and wine and the heady perfumes of Mediterranean vegetation. It’s wonder it has attracted the rich and famous, the artistic and reclusive and ever-growing throngs of summer visitors for so long.

Ardeche

You will fall under the spell of the Ardeche. It is an ideal destination for outdoor sports holidays: cycling and mountain biking, hiking and horse riding. The Ardeche is also a cultural destination, with art and cultural heritage: visit its villages with character, discover its history and nature sites, such as the Chauvet cave, the Ray-Pic waterfalls, the Mont-Gerbier-de-Jonc and River Loire sources as well as the Aven d’Orgnac.

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